July 2015-3

Mach-Adpotion-Event

Senior Animal Adoption Days
Every Wednesday at MCHS

Animals have much to offer and make some of the best companions. That is why MCHS believes that just as animals of all ages and abilities should have loving companions, so should people. To help make this a reality, MCHS Senior Days are every Wednesday. Adopters over 60 years of age, who cannot afford the full fee will receive a 50% discount on selected dogs or cats.

Help brighten the lives of our community’s seniors and animals that are waiting for homes.
4000 Coleman Road, Paducah, Ky. 270-443-5923

Download the Senior Adoption Day Flyer

Summer Pet Care

June 21st officially marks the first day of summer; meaning we need to be consciously and consistently be aware of our beloved pet’s safety and welfare in the upcoming heated months ahead, as we enjoy the great outdoors!

 

When the lazy days of barbecues and swimming pools roll around, you can make them even better by sharing them with your favorite pet.

By following a few summer pet safety tips, you can keep your animal friends healthy and enjoy the months of sun and fun.

Your Car Is An Oven ~ Sun + humidity = heatstroke (and other factors that kill)
Pet First Aid ~ Be prepared before an emergency strikes.

However, we have important life saving tips and suggestions to help you and your pets safely gain the most enjoyment out of the warm summer months.

  • Never leave your pet in the car. Though it may seem cool outside, the sun can raise the temperature inside your car to 120 degrees Fahrenheit in a matter of minutes, even with the windows rolled down. If you need to run some errands, leave the furry ones at home.
  • As you’re outside enjoying the warm weather, keep your pet leashed. It will keep her from getting lost, fighting other animals, and eating and drinking things that could make her sick. This tip isn’t just for dogs–even cats can learn to walk on a leash if you train them.
  • Water, water everywhere. Whether you’re indoors or out, both you and your pet need access to lots of fresh water during the summer, so check their water bowl several times a day to be sure it’s full. If you and your furry friend venture forth for the afternoon, bring plenty of water for both of you.
  • Pets need sunscreen too. Though all that fur helps protect her, your pet can get sunburned, particularly if she has light skin and hair. Sunburn in animals can cause problems similar to those it can cause in people, including pain, peeling, and skin cancer. So keep your pet out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and when you do go out, rub a bit of sunblock on unprotected areas like the tips of her ears, the skin around her lips, and the tip of her nose.
  • Say no to tangles. Keeping your pet groomed will help their hair do what it was designed to do: protect them from the sun and insulate them from the heat. If they have extremely thick hair or a lot of mats and tangles, their fur may trap too much heat, so you may want to clip them for the summer months.
  • Watch out for antifreeze. Hot weather may tempt your pet to drink from puddles in the street, which can contain antifreeze and other chemicals. Antifreeze has a sweet taste that animals like, but it’s extremely toxic. When you’re walking your pet, make sure she doesn’t sneak a drink from the street.
  • Be cautious on humid days. Humidity interferes with animals’ ability to rid themselves of excess body heat. When we overheat we sweat, and when the sweat dries it takes excess heat with it. Our four-legged friends only perspire around their paws, which is not enough to cool the body. To rid themselves of excess heat, animals pant. Air moves through the nasal passages, which picks up excess heat from the body. As it is expelled through the mouth, the extra heat leaves along with it. Although this is a very efficient way to control body heat, it is severely limited in areas of high humidity or when the animal is in close quarters.
  • Make sure your pet doesn’t over excert itself.  Though exercise is an important part of keeping your dog or cat at a healthy weight, which helps their body stay cool, overdoing it can cause them to overheat. Keep the walks to a gentle pace and make sure they has plenty of water. If they are panting a lot or seem exhausted, it’s time to stop.
  • Take it easy on pets that can’t deal with the heat. Elderly, very young, and ill animals have a hard time regulating their body temperature, so make sure they stay cool and out of the sun on steamy summer days. Dogs with snub noses, such as Pekingese, pugs, and bulldogs, have a hard time staying cool because they can’t pant efficiently, so they also need to stay out of the heat. Overweight dogs are also more prone to overheating, because their extra layers of fat act as insulation, which traps heat in their bodies and restricts their breathing capabilities.
  • Bring them inside. Animals shouldn’t be left outside unsupervised on long, hot days, even in the shade. Shade can move throughout the afternoon, and pets can become ill quickly if they overheat, so keep them inside as much as possible. If you must leave your pet in the backyard, keep a close eye on them or bring them in when you can.
  • Keep an eye out for heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency. If you suspect your pet has heatstroke (see “Signs of Heat stroke” below), you must act quickly and calmly. Have someone call a veterinarian immediately. In the meantime, lower the animal’s body temperature by applying towels soaked in cool water to the hairless areas of the body. Often the pet will respond after only a few minutes of cooling, only to falter again with his temperature soaring back up or falling to well below what is normal. With this in mind, remember that it is imperative to get the animal to a veterinarian immediately. Once your pet is in the veterinarian’s care, treatment may include further cooling techniques, intravenous fluid therapy to counter shock, or medication to prevent or reverse brain damage.

Even with emergency treatment, heatstroke can be fatal. The best cure is prevention, and Fido and Fluffy are relying on you to keep them out of harm’s way. Summer does not have to be fraught with peril–with ample precaution, both you and your furry friends can enjoy those long, hot dog-days of summer.

Now let’s have some safe and memorable lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer, with our favorite pet!
Signs of Heat stroke:

  • Panting
  • Staring
  • Anxious expression
  • Refusal to obey commands
  • Warm, dry skin
  • High fever
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Vomiting
  • Collapse

Happy Adopters

Legacy of Love

Spay & Neuter Fund

McCracken County Humane Society, Inc.

A Legacy of Love Spay & Neuter Fund has been set up to further our commitment to spay & neuter all animals before adoption. Our goal is to make a difference in the over-population of cats and dogs. With this fund we can offer low cost surgeries and education to those in need. PLEASE HELP IN THE EFFORT TO REDUCE THE OVERPOPULATION OF UNWANTED DOGS AND CATS BY GIVING TO THIS FUND

Click Here to Download

If you would like to donate and be a part of this project,
please call 270-443-5923, Click Here, or mail check to:

McCracken County Humane Society, Inc.
4000 Coleman Road
Paducah, Ky. 42001

Petango is a store that provides adopters and supporters access to competitively priced pet food, supplies and pharmacy needs online, while driving a portion of every purchase back to our organization.